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6 "Jung Ho Heo"
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Original articles
Postoperative effects of bariatric surgery on heart rate recovery and heart rate variability
Han Su Park, Kyungwon Seo, Hyeon Soo Kim, Sung il Im, Bong Joon Kim, Bu Kyung Kim, Jung Ho Heo
Kosin Med J. 2022;37(2):119-126.   Published online June 27, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7180/kmj.22.020
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  • 36 Download
Abstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Several studies have reported associations between obesity and autonomic dysfunction. However, little research has investigated the effect of bariatric surgery on heart rate recovery (HRR) in the treadmill test and heart rate variability (HRV) in 24-hour Holter monitoring. We investigated the effects of bariatric surgery on HRR and HRV, which are parameters related to autonomic dysfunction.
Methods
We retrospectively investigated patients who underwent bariatric surgery in 2019. The treadmill test, 24-hour Holter monitoring, and echocardiography were performed before and 6 months after surgery. We compared the changes in HRR in the treadmill test and HRV parameters such as the time domain and spectral domain in 24-hour Holter monitoring before and after surgery.
Results
Of the 40 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, 25 patients had the treadmill test or 24-hour Holter monitoring both before and after surgery. Body weight and body mass index significantly decreased after surgery (112.86±24.37 kg vs. 89.10±20.26 kg, p<0.001; 39.22±5.69 kg/m2 vs. 31.00±5.09 kg/m2, p<0.001, respectively). HRR significantly increased (n=23; 43.00±20.97 vs. 64.29±18.49, p=0.001). The time domain of HRV parameters increased (n=21; standard deviation of the N-N interval 123.57±28.05 vs. 152.57±39.49, p=0.002 and mean N-N interval 791.57±88.84 vs. 869.05±126.31, p=0.002).
Conclusions
Our data showed that HRR after exercise and HRV during 24-hour Holter monitoring improved after weight reduction with bariatric surgery through improved cardiac autonomic function.
Effects of White-coat Hypertension on Heart Rate Recovery and Blood Pressure Response during Exercise Test
Sol Jin, Jung Ho Heo, Bong Jun Kim
Kosin Med J. 2020;35(2):89-100.   Published online December 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7180/kmj.2020.35.2.89
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  • 8 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Objectives

White-coat hypertension is defined as high blood pressure (BP) on clinical assessment but normal BP elsewhere or on ambulatory measurement. Autonomic dysfunction may be one of the mechanisms causing white-coat hypertension. Slowed heart rate recovery and excessive BP response during exercise test are associated with autonomic dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between white-coat hypertension and abnormal autonomic nervous system response.

Methods

We assessed 295 patients stratified into three groups via 24hr ambulatory BP monitoring, following 2017 ACC/AHA guidelines: normal BP group, white-coat hypertension group, and a hypertension group. We analyzed medical history, blood test, echocardiography, 24hr ambulatory BP monitoring, and exercise test data.

Results

There was no difference in basement characteristics and echocardiography among the groups. Blunted heart rate recovery of each group showed a significant difference. Control group had 0% blunted heart rate recovery, but 33.3% in white coat group and 27.6% in true hypertension group (P < 0.001). Also, in the control group, 4.5% showed excessive BP response, but 31.5% in the white coat hypertension group and 29.3% in the true hypertension group (P < 0.001). Excessive BP response during the exercise test or blunted heart rate recovery, which is an indicator of autonomic nervous system abnormality, was more common in the hypertensive group and white-coat hypertension group than in the normal BP group.

Conclusions

These results confirmed that white-coat hypertension has an autonomic nervous system risk. Therefore, white-coat hypertension can be a future cardiovascular risk factor.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Study on Maximal Oxygen Uptake of Respiration and Heart Rate in Exercise Training Based on Regression Equation
    Yongqing Liang, Qiufen Yu, Balakrishnan Nagaraj
    Journal of Healthcare Engineering.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
The significance of blood pressure variation and metabolic risk factors in patients with different stages of hypertension
Sun Min Kim, In Kyoung Shim, Ju Won Lee, Jun Yeob Lee, Si Won Lee, Kyoung Im Cho, Hyun Su Kim, Jae Woo Lee, Jung Ho Heo
Kosin Med J. 2017;32(2):179-190.   Published online December 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7180/kmj.2017.32.2.179
  • 1,239 View
  • 2 Download
Abstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Objectives

Blood pressure variation (BPV) and metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. Ambulatory blood Pressure (ABP) has been shown to be more closely related to cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients than conventional office BP (OBP). Using both OBP and ABP, 4 groups of patients were identified: (1) normotensive patients (NT); (2) white coat hypertensives (WCHT); (3) masked hypertensives (MHT); and (4) sustainedhypertensives (SHT). We investigated the significance of BPV and metabolic risks of these 4 groups.

Methods

This study is a retrospective analysis of patients between January 2008 and May 2013. Echocardiography and 24 hour ABP monitoring were performed.

Results

BMI was significantly higher in the MHT compared with the NT. There were progressive increases in fasting glucose level from NT to WCHT, MHT, and SHT.MHT and SHT had higher 24h and nighttime BPV than NT.MHT was significantly related with BMI (r = 0.139, P = 0.010), creatinine (r = 0.144, P = 0.018), fasting glucose (r = 0.128, P = 0.046), daytime systolic BPV (r = 0.130, P = 0.017), and daytime diastolic BPV (r = 0.130, P = 0.017). Dyslipidemia (r = 0.110, P = 0.043), nighttime systolic BPV (r = 0.241, P < 0.001) and nighttime diastolic BPV (r = 0.143, P = 0.009) shown correlation with SHT. In multivariate logistic regression, MHT was independently associated with Body mass index (OR 1.086, 95% CI 1.005–1.174, P = 0.038) and creatinine (OR 1.005, 95% CI 1.001–1.010, P = 0.045).

Conclusions

BPV and metabolic risk factors were found to be greater in MHT and SHT compared with NT and WCHT. This suggests that BPV and metabolic risks may contribute to the elevated cardiovascular risk observed in patients with MHT and SHT.

Case reports
Anomalies of the coronary arteries originating from the right sinus of Valsalva
Jung Ho Heo
Kosin Med J. 2007;22(1):287-290.   Published online June 30, 2007
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  • 2 Download
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Painless Thoracic Aortic Dissection Presenting as High Paraplegia
Jung Ho Heo
Kosin Med J. 2007;22(1):291-295.   Published online June 30, 2007
  • 195 View
  • 1 Download
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Percutaneous coronary stenting in guide-induced aortocoronary dissection
Jung Ho Heo
Kosin Med J. 2007;22(1):296-300.   Published online June 30, 2007
  • 276 View
  • 2 Download
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KMJ : Kosin Medical Journal