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Original articles
STAT3 inhibition decreases ATP-induced MUC8 gene expression in human airway epithelial cells
Cheol Hong Kim, Kyoung Seob Song
Kosin Med J. 2022;37(2):134-139.   Published online June 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7180/kmj.22.102
  • 1,368 View
  • 11 Download
  • 2 Citations
Abstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Background
Contact between the human pulmonary system and bacteria, viruses, or other pathogens can induce airway diseases. Although pathogen-induced mucus oversecretion and hyperproduction are frequently observed in the human respiratory tract, the molecular mechanisms of pathogen-induced mucus hypersecretion and overproduction remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the physiological signaling mechanism of ATP-induced MUC8 gene expression in human airway epithelial cells.
Methods
Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, a cytokine array, and a Ca2+ concentration assay were performed to investigate the ATP/P2Y2-induced MUC8 gene expression levels in human airway epithelial cells.
Results
The ATP/P2Y2 complex robustly secreted interleukin (IL)-6 in a time-dependent manner, whereas siRNA-P2Y2 did not. Moreover, ATP/P2Y2 induced MUC8 gene expression. IL-6 secreted by ATP strongly elevated ATP/P2Y2-induced MUC8 gene expression compared to ATP/P2Y2. Interestingly, a specific STAT3 inhibitor, 5,15-DPP, dramatically inhibited ATP/P2Y2/IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and resulted in an approximately 5-fold decrease in MUC8 gene expression.
Conclusions
We showed that IL-6-activated STAT6 is essential for ATP/P2Y2-induced MUC8 gene expression as part of inflammatory signaling by cytokines during airway inflammation. Our results provide a new molecular understanding of the signaling mechanism of MUC8 gene expression during airway inflammation.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Inhibition of Urban Particulate Matter-Induced Airway Inflammation by RIPK3 through the Regulation of Tight Junction Protein Production
    Sun-Hee Park, Hyun-Chae Lee, Hye Min Jeong, Jeong-Sang Lee, Hee-Jae Cha, Cheol Hong Kim, Jeongtae Kim, Kyoung Seob Song
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(17): 13320.     CrossRef
  • PDZ Peptide of the ZO-1 Protein Significantly Increases UTP-Induced MUC8 Anti-Inflammatory Mucin Overproduction in Human Airway Epithelial Cells
    Han Seo, Hyun-Chae Lee, Ki Chul Lee, Doosik Kim, Jiwook Kim, Donghee Kang, Hyung-Joo Chung, Hee-Jae Cha, Jeongtae Kim, Kyoung Seob Song
    Molecules and Cells.2023; 46(11): 700.     CrossRef
Effects of Changes in Inspiratory Time on Inspiratory Flowrate and Airway Pressure during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Manikin-Based Study
Jung Ju Lee, Su Yeong Pyo, Ji Han Lee, Gwan Jin Park, Sang Chul Kim, Hoon Kim, Suk Woo Lee, Young Min Kim, Hyun Seok Chai
Kosin Med J. 2021;36(2):100-108.   Published online December 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7180/kmj.2021.36.2.100
  • 1,860 View
  • 29 Download
Abstract PDFPubReader   ePub   
Objectives

Given that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an aerosol-generating procedure, it is necessary to use a mechanical ventilator and reduce the number of providers involved in resuscitation for in-hospital cardiac arrest in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients or suspected COVID-19 patients. However, no study assessed the effect of changes in inspiratory time on flowrate and airway pressure during CPR. We herein aimed to determine changes in these parameters during CPR and identify appropriate ventilator management for adults during CPR.

Methods

We measured changes in tidal volume (Vt), peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR), peak airway pressure (Ppeak), mean airway pressure (Pmean) according to changes in inspiratory time (0.75 s, 1.0 s and 1.5 s) with or without CPR. Vt of 500 mL was supplied (flowrate: 10 times/min) using a mechanical ventilator. Chest compressions were maintained at constant compression depth (53 ± 2 mm) and speed (102 ± 2/min) using a mechanical chest compression device.

Results

Median levels of respiratory physiological parameters during CPR were significantly different according to the inspiratory time (0.75 s vs. 1.5 s): PIFR (80.8 [73.3 – 87.325] vs. 70.5 [67 – 72.4] L/min, P < 0.001), Ppeak (54 [48 – 59] vs. 47 [45 – 49] cmH2O, P < 0.001), and Pmean (3.9 [3.6 – 4.1] vs. 5.7 [5.6 – 5.8] cmH2O, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

Changes in PIFR, Ppeak, and Pmean were associated with inspiratory time. PIFR and Ppeak values tended to decrease with increase in inspiratory time, while Pmean showed a contrasting trend. Increased inspiratory time in low-compliance cardiac arrest patients will help in reducing lung injury during adult CPR.

Case reports
General Anesthesia for a Patient with GNE Myopathy: a case report
Christine Kang, Ji-hye An, Jae-Young Kwon, Boo-Young Hwang
Kosin Med J. 2020;35(1):64-68.   Published online June 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7180/kmj.2020.35.1.64
  • 959 View
  • 5 Download
Abstract PDFPubReader   ePub   

GNE, or bifunctional UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase, myopathy presents with symptoms of foot drop, followed by lower and upper extremity muscle weaknesses and sparing of the quadriceps. Myopathies usually increase the risks of complications related to general anesthesia. The anesthetic management of patients with GNEmyopathy has not been previously reported. Herein, we report a case of GNEmyopathy in a 37-year-old woman and discuss anesthetic considerations for elective laparoscopic hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy, focusing on the postoperative airway management. We avoided administering neuromuscular-blocking agents and instead used a laryngeal mask airway.

The anesthetic management combining the use of a laryngeal mask airway and desflurane without neuromuscular-blocking agents provided sufficient abdominal and diaphragmatic muscle relaxations for sustaining the pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery.

Use of laryngeal mask after repeated endotracheal intubation failure in a patient with tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica: case report
Sang Gyun Kim, Hyun Kim, Jong Chul Son, Ji-Hyang Lee, Jihyun An, Eunju Kim
Kosin Med J. 2018;33(2):252-256.   Published online December 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7180/kmj.2018.33.2.252
  • 854 View
  • 0 Download
Abstract PDFPubReader   ePub   

We report a case of difficult endotracheal intubation in a patient with tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica. A 65-year-old man was scheduled to undergo ulnar nerve decompression and ganglion excisional biopsy under general anesthesia. During induction of general anesthesia, an endotracheal tube could not be advanced through the vocal cords due to resistance. A large number of nodules were identified below the vocal cords using a Glidescope® video-laryngoscopy, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed irregular nodules on the surface of the entire trachea and the main bronchus below the vocal cords. Use of a small endotracheal tube was attempted and failed. a laryngeal mask airway (LMA Supreme ™) rather than further intubation was successfully used to maintain the airway.

Original articles
Efficacy of Foreign Body Removal using a Cryoprobe in Flexible Bronchoscopy
Go Eun Yeo, Sung-Jin Nam, Yu Jin Han, Eun Jeong Kim, Nam Kyu Kim, So Young Ock, Weon Hyoung Lee, Chul Ho Oak, Mann Hong Jung, Tae Won Jang
Kosin Med J. 2014;29(1):31-36.   Published online December 17, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7180/kmj.2014.29.1.31
  • 949 View
  • 5 Download
Abstract PDFPubReader   
Abstract Objectives

Endobronchial foreign body impaction is a medical emergency because of the air way obstruction. Therefore, immediate foreign body removal is crucial in such situations. Recently, there have been several reports about cryoprobe use as a tool for removal of foreign bodies. In this study, we determined the efficacy and complications of foreign body removal using a cryoprobe during flexible bronchoscopy.

Methods

This is a retrospective review of 27 patients who visited Kosin University Gospel Hospital from August 2007 to August 2010 with respiratory symptoms due to a foreign body in the airway. There were 17 males and 10 females, aged from 7 to 78 years. The foreign bodies were more frequently located (55%) in the right bronchus. The cryoprobe was inserted through the forceps channel of the flexible bronchoscope under local anesthesia. The lesion was quickly frozen for 5 seconds at -80℃, and the bronchoscope was removed with the probe after crystal formation on the contacted area.

Results

The success rate of removal of foreign bodies was 85% (23/27) using the cryoprobe. One case of broncholith did not undergo attempted removal because of the possibility of excessive hemorrhage by the tight bronchus impaction, and three cases (plastic, silicon, and implant) failed due to limited crystal formation. There were no severe hemorrhages, arrhythmias, or casualties during the procedure.

Conclusions

The removal of foreign body using a cryoprobe during flexible bronchoscopy was shown to be safe and effective. The nature of the material should be attempted before removing a foreign body.

asal Packing with Airway Silicone Splint and Vaseline Gauze After Closed Reduction of Nasal Bone Fracture
Yea Sik Han
Kosin Med J. 2010;25(2):82-86.   Published online December 31, 2010
  • 252 View
  • 0 Download
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Clinical Significance of FEF25-75 as the Predictive Factor of Positive Methacholine Bronchial Provocation Test
Hee Kyoo Kim
Kosin Med J. 2009;24(2):32-35.   Published online December 31, 2009
  • 240 View
  • 0 Download
PDF

KMJ : Kosin Medical Journal