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Yoon Ji Choi 1 Article
The Effect of Patient-controlled Intravenous Analgesia (PCIA) on Postoperative Delirium in Patients with Liver Transplantation: a Propensity Score Matching Analysis
Hyo Jung Son, Ukjin Jeong, Kunwoong Choi, Ju Yeon Park, Eun-Ji Choi, Hyun-Su Ri, Tae Beom Lee, Byung Hyun Choi, Yoon Ji Choi
Kosin Med J. 2021;36(1):14-24.   Published online June 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.7180/kmj.2021.36.1.14
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Abstract PDFPubReader   ePub   CrossRef-TDMCrossref - TDM
Objectives

Postoperative opioid use and pain are related to postoperative delirium. This study aims to compare the incidence of delirium in patients with and without patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) among liver transplant recipients.

Methods

The medical records of 253 patients who received liver transplantation (LT) from January 2010 to July 2017 in a single university hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: the patients who had used PCIA (P group, n = 71) and those who did not use PCIA (C group, n = 182) after LT in intensive care unit (ICU). The patient data were collected, which included demographic data, and details about perioperative management and postoperative complications.

Results

There was no difference in the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score between the two groups. Postoperative delirium occurred in 10 / 71 (14.08 %) in the P group and 26 / 182 (14.29 %) in the C group after LT, respectively (P = 0.97). After propensity score matching, no differences were observed in the incidence of delirium (P = 0.359) and the time from surgery to discharge (P = 0.26) between the two groups.

Conclusions

Patients with PCIA after LT exhibited no relationship with postoperative delirium. Therefore, it is necessary to actively control postoperative pain using PCIA.


KMJ : Kosin Medical Journal